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USCIS Immigration Certified Translation

USCIS Immigration Certified Translation: When do you need certified translated paperwork?

USCIS Certified Translation Services

When it comes to translation, small differences in language can make a big difference in how a message is understood. Translation is more than converting words into their counterparts in other languages—it’s also about understanding context, word usage, local dialects, and other intricacies that affect the meaning of a word, or carry unintended connotations that could change how that message is received.

This is why certified translation is often required for a wide range of business and government activities. Certified translation services offer a degree of quality assurance for any translation by confirming that the translation meets the requirements of different certification standards. The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services bureau requires certified translations of application documents and other written materials to ensure that the accuracy of these documents is verified because the information they contain is used to process immigration paperwork and even make determinations on applications for citizenship.

If you’re doing business or seeking the assistance of USCIS for any reason, it’s important to enlist the help of USCIS certified translation to improve your chances of a smooth paperwork process.

Who Needs USCIS-Approved Translations?

Unless you and any people you represent are all native English speakers, you are encouraged to seek out certified translation services for any type of document, application, or record being submitted to USCIS.

Certain organizations may face a regular need for these services and should seek out a certified translation partner to handle their various translation needs. Immigration law offices, for example, face a constant need for certified translation services. Additionally, because immigration lawyers can deal with a wide range of clients representing many different countries and linguistic backgrounds, it’s impractical for them to retain certified translators in-house, creating an urgent need for access to translation services that span many different languages.

Similarly, businesses working with foreign entities or employees may need certified translation to handle financial statements, legal documents, employment verification documents, or other materials related to individuals who may need to come to America for business purposes. 

Individual clients may also face the occasional need for certified translation services when dealing with USCIS to seek document processing and approvals that can range from passports and visas to adoption papers, to academic transcripts for foreign individuals looking to attend college in the United States.

What Types of Documents Need USCIS-Certified Translation, and Why?

The short answer is simple: Anything USCIS requests as part of any service or application process needs to receive a certified translation if the original documents are written in a foreign language. The primary reason is to ensure the accuracy of information when it is reviewed by the government office. 

Poor translations don’t just affect the organization’s ability to review and approve documents and applications—it can also increase the risk that the documents or approvals you seek will be denied due to inaccuracies or incomplete information, sending you back to square one of this process.

While not an exhaustive list, documents that will require USCIS certified translation include the following:

  • Passports and visas
  • Birth certificates
  • Adoption papers
  • Marriage and divorce documents
  • Death certificates
  • Academic transcripts
  • Medical records
  • Police records
  • Legal transcripts
  • Financial statements
  • Any other document requested by USCIS

If you’re in need of translation services when submitting documents to USCIS, it’s crucial that you ensure any translation service you hire has an active ISO 9001 or ISO 17100 certification, in accordance with USCIS guidelines.

Put Your Best Foot Forward With USCIS

When you submit any foreign documents to USCIS, the organization will require two versions of each document: the original version in its foreign language, and a full English translated version. This can add another layer of complication to an already difficult process. One way to alleviate the stress and uncertainty of dealing with USCIS procedures is to seek out the guidance and translation services of a certified translator.

Protranslating offers the ISO certifications that guarantee accuracy and satisfaction with any translation services you require, and our translators serve more than 200 languages and dialects from around the world. We also have extensive experience working with USCIS, so you get the benefit of both our translation services and our familiarity with a complex, often confusing process.
If you need foreign documents translated, we’re here to help. Contact us today to find out more about our certified translation services.

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